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  • As innovative applications such as big data and IoT increasingly become the bedrock of global business operations, the need for data centre power protection has never been more critical. Although the effects of downtime vary from industry to industry, in extreme cases, a single outage can translate to millions of dollars of lost revenue.

    There are a number of devices that today’s data centres rely on for power protection, but chief among them are uninterruptable power supplies (UPS). UPS’ serve two essential functions. First, to help protect ICT equipment from power abnormalities on the main supply, and if the mains supply fails, to step in and support the critical load until the mains is restored or replaced by an alternative supply such as a generator. By ensuring continuous power supply, UPS’ help eliminate the danger of costly power outages.

    The post Data centre manager’s guide to replacing a DRUPS appeared first on Techerati.

  • Over the past few decades, technological advances have enabled telecom service providers to consolidate their network infrastructure. The reduction in equipment size, coupled with an improved ability to bridge larger distances, has also allowed service providers to reduce their data centre footprint.

    But with the reduction in data centre sites, the modern facility has also become comparatively supersized and energy hungry, mainly due to the never-ending increase of network traffic. To mitigate this challenge, companies such as Verizon are turning to machine learning and data analytics to improve the energy efficiency of facilities.

    The post DCW Frankfurt 19: How Verizon deploys machine learning to improve energy efficiency appeared first on Techerati.

  • When I first heard about KaoData, I was immediately intrigued. Born and raised in North London, the idea of a facility popping up in Harlow that boasted itself as one of the largest developments in the UK, with the potential to support an IT load of 35MW across 150,000sq ft of space, seemed unthinkable. Naturally, when I was invited to have a look around, I jumped at the chance.

    The first thing that hit me was just how easy it was to find the data centre. Kao Park is situated just minutes off the M25 but the location itself wasn’t a fluke. Gerard Thibault, chief technical officer, explained that the site was selected based on a number of factors. Accessibility was crucial, the facility needed to be easy for staff and customers to reach by road, train or plane. Positioned in the heart of the London-Stansted-Cambridge corridor, with the M1, M11, M25 all in close proximity, Harlow train station just 10 minutes away by taxi, and Luton, Stansted and City. airports all in close vicinity, they were able to pinpoint the perfect spot.

    The post Kao Data: A bright future appeared first on Techerati.

  • Cyber-Physical Systems (CPS) are a mix of computation, networking and physical processes, in which the embedded computational algorithms and networks have the power to monitor and control the physical components.

    By using a combination of machines, sensory devices, embedded computational intelligence and various communication mechanisms, CPS monitor physical elements with computer-based algorithms tied to the internet. This means they are capable of autonomously functioning based on their physical surroundings.

    In light of advancements in analytics, artificial intelligence (AI) and communications, there is increased demand for intelligent machines that can interact with the environment around them, such as driverless cars which monitor and communicate with their surroundings, and smart appliances that optimise energy consumption. CPS are stimulating significant changes in quality of life and forming the basis of smart infrastructure, products, and services.

    As this kind of technology continues to become more integrated into our everyday lives, here are four areas of CPS we can expect to come to the fore.

    The post Cyber-physical systems explained appeared first on Techerati.

  • Given their many advantages over alternative technologies, lithium-ion batteries are gaining in popularity as a power backup option for data centre Uninterruptible Power Supply (UPS) systems. A 2018 Bloomberg New Energy Finance report forecasted that Li-ion technology will comprise 40 percent of all data centre backup batteries by 2025, and that in the hyperscale sector, Li-ion will become the predominant battery technology, accounting for 55 percent of UPS batteries.

    Compared with traditional valve-regulated lead-acid (VRLA) alternatives, Li-ion batteries offer greater power density, smaller size, less weight and longer operating life. They can also withstand many more charge/recharge cycles, typically more than 1,000 compared with 200-400, before losing their ability to provide effective backup power.

    As a result, they occupy less space, incur lower maintenance costs and require less frequent replacement than VRLA batteries offering the user a lower total cost of ownership (TCO) over the lifecycle. This helps to offset their chief disadvantage, an initial cost premium, but even that is steadily diminishing thanks to ongoing technology development and increased manufacturing volumes.

    Additionally, recent studies conducted by Schneider Electric’s Data Centre Science Centre, detailed in White Paper #229: ‘Battery Technology for Data Centers’, found that over a 10-year period, Li-ion delivered a TCO that is between 10 percent and 40 percent lower than equivalent UPS systems based on VRLA batteries.

    The post UPS Power Considerations: The Lithium-ion Tradeoff appeared first on Techerati.

  • Hyperconverged infrastructure (HCI) has gone mainstream, yet myths still remain that lead to misconception and confusion even among those that already have various HCI solutions deployed. These are five of the most prevalent myths debunked.

    First of all, the acquisition price of HCI solution varies by vendor and often by the brand of hypervisor used in the solution. Secondly, while it can often be the case that purchasing the individual components needed to create a virtualisation infrastructure may be less expensive than purchasing an HCI solution, that is only part of the cost of the solution. The true and total cost of infrastructure goes far beyond the initial purchase.

    The post 5 myths about hyperconverged infrastructure debunked appeared first on Techerati.

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