Industry News

Sample

16 Feb 2018

Inclusion in the data centre industry: the way forward

Ian

The biggest challenge faced in the government data centre environment is running a mixed, hybrid data centre. The demands of the environment mean that the team has to operate many instances of technology in a space designed in the late nineties.

There are ‘old school’ air-cooled racks running happily at 4kW through to high density, water-cooled racks pushing 60kW, through to immersion cooled systems and super-compute.

Obviously, if a new data centre was planned today, it would be ideal to introduce some segregation to maximise cooling and energy efficiencies.

In this space, that’s not really possible, so the team is often looking for innovative, new technologies, to help make the savings and efficiencies that keep the CFO happy while still delivering the performance that the business needs to carry out its mission.

Inclusion in the data centre industry

For those who spend their life involved in making sure complex IT operations run smoothly, it may be easy to forget that many on the ‘outside’ exist unaware of the work that goes into running the technology they take for granted.

Looking at the younger generation can help with this. Ian notes that a significant portion of his son’s life exists online, whether that’s on a computer, phone, games console, smart TV, or any other modern, connected device.

And yet, until they had spoken about Ian’s work, there was little thought or understanding given to the architecture, power, space, cooling, compute, networking and storage that went into it.

This is, of course, understandable, but also an important point for those that are looking to create a more inclusive and diverse industry. By making more young people aware of what goes into the behind-the-scenes work, Ian feels confident that this fast-moving, exciting and rewarding industry will become more appealing.

He also argues that the industry as a whole is not very good at communicating outside of its immediate confines. There is a need to get evangelists out of data centres and into schools, colleges and careers fairs.

There is growing interest across the industry in developing apprenticeships, and defining the standards for the data centre technician role and what that would look like for somebody moving into the industry, something which Ian is actively involved with and looks to encourage.

All that being said, the data centre sector is no more troubled by diversity problems than any other. Ian notes the number of examples of companies that have made great progress, by changing their culture and implementing diversity policies.

Speaking from personal experience, Ian takes it as a great positive that he can look around his organisation and see a significantly more diverse workplace than when he started. There’s been a great effort to change, both in terms of culture and corporate beliefs, and this has had a positive impact.

To a large extent, this process has been helped along by legislation. Within his organisation, there are no barriers to entry on the basis of any protected characteristic as stated in the Single Equality Act 2010. As far as possible, the only entry requirement should be that the person is right for the job.

How the future looks

As these requirements become practice, attitudes change too. It is now becoming a common belief that diversity and inclusion are about recognising the value of individual differences and embracing them so that everyone can be themselves at work, and therefore able to give their best in a supportive environment. This is a belief that Ian holds strongly – he argues that diversity and inclusion is everyone’s responsibility.

Events like Data Centre World, and its Diversity and Talent Stream, are also part of the solution. Ian argues that conferences and exhibitions help promote the industry and can help open up a track for currently underrepresented groups to be introduced to the people and careers within it.

If the future of people in the industry looks more diverse, how does it look technologically? Ian cites a number of exciting developments being made in the fields of density and cooling. Immersion cooling, the linking of water-cooled systems together, and technology that requires different water temperatures until you arrive at a marketable hot water commodity at the end of the chain are among these developments.

Rack densities are constantly on the rise too, with Ian’s team pushing 60kW in a standard rack. There is even talk of one data centre manufacturer reaching 100kW, by using innovative water-cooled systems.

These rapidly rising numbers are just one demonstration of the pace of change within the industry, and Ian sees the next big change being in battery technology, where he thinks there will be an increasing focus thanks to driverless cars and the move towards green and carbon neutral policies.

Perhaps these advances will come as a by-product of other developments, but in the fast-moving data centre industry, pushing the pace of change is a natural part of life. Quoting computing giant Alan Kay, Ian believes that “the best way to predict the future is to invent it.”

View all Industry News
Loading

Sponsors

Platinum Sponsor

Platinum Sponsor

Platinum Sponsor

Platinum Sponsor

Platinum Sponsor

Official Project Delivery Partner

Gold Sponsors

Gold Sponsors

Gold Sponsors

Silver Sponsors

Silver Sponsors

 

Silver Sponsors

 

Silver Sponsors


 

Bronze Sponsors



 

Bronze Sponsors




 

Bronze Sponsors





 

Bronze Sponsors


 

Global Sponsors


 

VIP Lounge Sponsor


 

Keynote Theatre Sponsor


 

Live Data Centre Of The Future Sponsors


 

Live Data Centre Of The Future Sponsors


 

Live Data Centre Of The Future Sponsors



 

Live Data Centre Of The Future Sponsors


 

Live Data Centre Of The Future Sponsors


 

Partners

Knowledge Partners

 

Offical Real Estate Partner

Official TV Partner


 

Official Video Partner


 

Official News Release Distribution Partner

 

Global Event Partner


 

Event Partner



 

Event Partner




 

Event Partner





 

Event Partner






 

Event Partners







 

Media Partners








 

Media Partners









 

Media Partners










 

Media Partners











 

Media Partners












 

Media Partners













 

Media Partners














 

Media Partners














 

Media Partners















 

Testimonials

  • The show has been absolutely amazing. The footfall we had on our stand was great – we were busy, rushed off our feet all day! We’ve got ten staff on stand and no-one stood still all day. It’s been a mixture of customers we know, new customers coming in from the data centre industry and the other industries that are here as well. So, it’s been a smashing event!
    Marketing Manager, NTT
  • We’ve seen lots of people, the right people. There’s been great footfall of industry relevant visitors - as expected, and we had lots of interest at our stand. I’ve had positive feedback from our sales team, they’ve had really good conversations, which is fantastic! We’re happy to be part of DCW and we’ve already signed up for next year.
    Sales and Marketing Manager, Stulz
  • At Data Centre World you will find all the important DC players and more importantly, all the delegates have the right job titles. It is a great place to network, so far we have had great conversations with existing and new customers. We’ve had great feedback from our sales team!
    Marketing Manager, Vertiv
  • The event was excellent and always busy, we did not have any quiet moments over the two days and took away some excellent leads and opportunities. The Data Centre World event in Singapore is definitely the most important event for us in APAC. We have already booked to come back in 2019!
    Head of Sales APAC, Stulz
  • This has been a good event as there was brand awareness generated. It's a good platform for showcasing data centre solutions and so far we've achieve some of our goals. We've also met some of the leads we've been looking for such as design engineers, staff from the Purchasing Departments, CEOs etc. We will definitely be back next year!
    Manager - Strategic Sales, Elcom
  • We supply equipment for data centre projects, and are here to get more connections and leads. We've received good support from the organisers of Data Centre World, and will come back next year as well.
    Business Development Manager, ZOE INTERNATIONAL